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Queensland rental laws – an update
Queensland rental laws - an update

Do you own, or are considering owning an investment property in Queensland?

Changes to rental laws in Queensland have just come into effect. If you’re a landlord, tenant or property manager, it’s important that you know and understand these changes.

Tune in and you’ll find out (in less than six minutes!) what these changes are, and the possible implications for both property investors and tenants.

It’s a ‘must-watch’ video to ensure you’re fully up to date.

For further information on these changes please visit the Queensland Government’s Residential Tenancies Authority website, or for specific advice related to your own property speak to your property manager.

If you’ve enjoyed this video then you might like to subscribe to our YouTube channel, or browse through our latest videos.

If you’d like entirely independent and unbiased advice that’s right for your unique situation and goals, then get in touch with us today.

Hello, everyone.

How are you all doing out there?

I’m Kate Hill bringing you the best and unbiased and honest content on property along with fantastic hints and tips.

Today, I want you to stay tuned to hear all about news on Queensland’s latest rental law changes.

Okay. So let’s start with looking at these important changes in Queensland’s rental laws, some of which came into effect on the sixth of June this year.

Whether you are a tenant or a landlord, these changes are crucial to understand.

So let’s break down some of these key changes.

All rental properties must meet minimum housing standards.

This includes safety requirements, cleanliness, and functionality of essential services like plumbing and electrical system.

Rent increases are now limited in frequency. They can only occur once every 12 months apparently helping to stabilize rental costs for tenants.

The rent increase frequency limit applies to the property itself, not to the individual lease.

So let’s recap on that.

Rent increases can only happen once every twelve months, and this now applies to the property or room rather than the tenancy or rooming agreement.

When starting a new rental agreement, you cannot charge more than the previous tenancy if the property is being re let within that same twelve month period.

Add on to that, new rental agreements have to state the date of the last rent increase, so be sure to include this information when you’re preparing a new tenancy.

A tenant can request in writing evidence of the last, rent increase, the date of it, from the managing agent, and you have to provide this information to them within fourteen days.

But the requirement to provide that evidence of a rent increase does not apply if the premises is purchased within twelve months of commencement and you don’t have information about the date of that last rent. Right?

If you’re taking the property over from a previous managing agent.

So just to be absolutely clear, the rent increase and the date of it stays with the property.

Doesn’t matter if you change tenants, it stays with the property.

That is the crucial thing to understand.

A property manager or owner cannot, at the start of a new tenancy, invite or accept if offered a prospective tenant to pay more rent in advance than exceeds two weeks for a periodic tenancy agreement and one month for a fixed tenancy agreement even if the prospective tenant makes the offer to pay more than the amount described in the legislation.

Rent bidding has been banned.

So this means that landlords and agents cannot solicit or accept offers of rent above the advertised price.

Again, this aims to make the rental market fairer for all tenants.

Even if a higher rent is offered by the tenant, you cannot accept it.

Tenants now have stronger rights under the new laws.

For example, tenants can now make minor modifications to the property without needing prior approval provided they follow certain guidelines.

Landlords are now required to ensure their properties meet the new minimum housing standards before renting them out, like I mentioned right at the beginning.

Queensland’s new minimum housing standards, which are actually effective from September twenty three for all new leases.

So properties have to be weatherproof, obviously, structurally sound.

It’s kinda common sense.

It means no major leaks or damage that compromises the structure or interior.

All external doors and windows must have functioning locks to ensure the property is secure.

So kitchens in facilities, they must have a functioning sink, stove, adequate food preparation space.

Bathrooms have to include a working toilet, shower, or bath with a basin with hot and cold water.

Adequate ventilation and lighting must be provided.

This includes windows that can open for airflow and sufficient artificial lighting.

Floors, walls, ceilings, roofs have to be structurally sound free from hazards like

holes or significant wear.

Electrical safety switches have to be installed to protect occupants from electrical hazards.

Smoke alarms, so they have to be installed in the property and maintained according to regulation.

Pest and vermin proofing, properties have to be free from pests and vermin infestations at the start of a tenancy and maintained during the lease.

All plumbing and drainage has to be operational with hot and cold water connected to appropriate fixtures.

These new laws allegedly mark a significant step forward in improving the rental market for both tenants and landlords.

Not quite sure how landlords are being benefited by this, but anyway.

For more detailed information, then obviously, visit, links to, Queensland’s residential tenancies websites, or obviously speak to your local property managers.

I will keep you posted on all things property from around Australia.

As the year progresses, don’t forget to hit like and subscribe if you are enjoying

all the content, and I will see you again really soon.

Bye.

 

Hello, everyone.

How are you all doing out there?

I’m Kate Hill bringing you the best and unbiased and honest content on property along with fantastic hints and tips.

Today, I want you to stay tuned to hear all about news on Queensland’s latest rental law changes.

Okay. So let’s start with looking at these important changes in Queensland’s rental laws, some of which came into effect on the sixth of June this year.

Whether you are a tenant or a landlord, these changes are crucial to understand.

So let’s break down some of these key changes.

All rental properties must meet minimum housing standards.

This includes safety requirements, cleanliness, and functionality of essential services like plumbing and electrical system.

Rent increases are now limited in frequency. They can only occur once every 12 months apparently helping to stabilize rental costs for tenants.

The rent increase frequency limit applies to the property itself, not to the individual lease.

So let’s recap on that.

Rent increases can only happen once every twelve months, and this now applies to the property or room rather than the tenancy or rooming agreement.

When starting a new rental agreement, you cannot charge more than the previous tenancy if the property is being re let within that same twelve month period.

Add on to that, new rental agreements have to state the date of the last rent increase, so be sure to include this information when you’re preparing a new tenancy.

A tenant can request in writing evidence of the last, rent increase, the date of it, from the managing agent, and you have to provide this information to them within fourteen days.

But the requirement to provide that evidence of a rent increase does not apply if the premises is purchased within twelve months of commencement and you don’t have information about the date of that last rent. Right?

If you’re taking the property over from a previous managing agent.

So just to be absolutely clear, the rent increase and the date of it stays with the property.

Doesn’t matter if you change tenants, it stays with the property.

That is the crucial thing to understand.

A property manager or owner cannot, at the start of a new tenancy, invite or accept if offered a prospective tenant to pay more rent in advance than exceeds two weeks for a periodic tenancy agreement and one month for a fixed tenancy agreement even if the prospective tenant makes the offer to pay more than the amount described in the legislation.

Rent bidding has been banned.

So this means that landlords and agents cannot solicit or accept offers of rent above the advertised price.

Again, this aims to make the rental market fairer for all tenants.

Even if a higher rent is offered by the tenant, you cannot accept it.

Tenants now have stronger rights under the new laws.

For example, tenants can now make minor modifications to the property without needing prior approval provided they follow certain guidelines.

Landlords are now required to ensure their properties meet the new minimum housing standards before renting them out, like I mentioned right at the beginning.

Queensland’s new minimum housing standards, which are actually effective from September twenty three for all new leases.

So properties have to be weatherproof, obviously, structurally sound.

It’s kinda common sense.

It means no major leaks or damage that compromises the structure or interior.

All external doors and windows must have functioning locks to ensure the property is secure.

So kitchens in facilities, they must have a functioning sink, stove, adequate food preparation space.

Bathrooms have to include a working toilet, shower, or bath with a basin with hot and cold water.

Adequate ventilation and lighting must be provided.

This includes windows that can open for airflow and sufficient artificial lighting.

Floors, walls, ceilings, roofs have to be structurally sound free from hazards like

holes or significant wear.

Electrical safety switches have to be installed to protect occupants from electrical hazards.

Smoke alarms, so they have to be installed in the property and maintained according to regulation.

Pest and vermin proofing, properties have to be free from pests and vermin infestations at the start of a tenancy and maintained during the lease.

All plumbing and drainage has to be operational with hot and cold water connected to appropriate fixtures.

These new laws allegedly mark a significant step forward in improving the rental market for both tenants and landlords.

Not quite sure how landlords are being benefited by this, but anyway.

For more detailed information, then obviously, visit, links to, Queensland’s residential tenancies websites, or obviously speak to your local property managers.

I will keep you posted on all things property from around Australia.

As the year progresses, don’t forget to hit like and subscribe if you are enjoying

all the content, and I will see you again really soon.

Bye.

 

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