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More long term apartment living
More long term apartment living

There’s change afoot in the landscape of Australian housing.

A notable transformation is occurring as more individuals opt for long term apartment living.

A big reason for this is Australia’s shrinking family size.

See these videos for more on this:

We’re shrinking! The shift in housing preferences 

How does a shrinking family size affect the property market?  

There are other factors of course, such as the widening gap between house and unit prices, and changes in lifestyle requirements post pandemic.

What does this all mean for property investors? Find out in this important update from Kate Hill.

If you’ve enjoyed this video then you might like to subscribe to our YouTube channel, or browse through our latest videos.

If you’d like entirely independent and unbiased advice that’s right for your unique situation and goals, then get in touch with us today.

Hello, everyone.

How are you all doing out there?

I’m Kate Hill bringing you the best unbiased, honest content on property along with fantastic hints and tips and news.

Stay tuned today to hear why there is a shift towards more long term apartment living happening in Australia.

The, what do I call it, landscape of Australian housing is undergoing a significant transformation with a notable increase in the number of people, individuals opting for long term apartment living.

This trend is propelled by various factors, most notably, Australia’s shrinking family size.

And that topic gets its very own separate video, so go and watch that.

And a widening gap between house and unit prices, prompts buyers to seek affordability, convenience in our urban settings.

According to Domain, the disparity in prices between houses and units has reached unprecedented levels.

They highlight that this phenomenon reflects a distortion within the housing market indicating either overvaluation of houses or undervaluation of units.

Domain suggest that this trend has been exacerbated of course by the ongoing effects of the pandemic reshaping perceptions of the ideal long term home.

As housing affordability becomes increasingly challenging, one of the research associates at the University of New South Wales has observed a notable shift towards apartment living.

They emphasised that while cost, obviously plays a significant role, other factors like proximity to work, transport, urban amenities contribute to this transition and also community.

The trend towards higher density housing further reinforces the appeal of apartment living with more Australians likely to embrace this lifestyle in the future.

The traditional notion of homeownership epitomised by the detached house on big block of land is really evolving, and Australians need to reassess their perceptions of the ideal first home in light of these changes.

As urban populations swell and cities expand, the dream of homeownership is adapting to align with contemporary realities.

The allure of apartment living lies not only in its affordability, but also in its suitability for urban lifestyles, which is, of course, characterised by convenience and accessibility and affordability.

Apartment living offers a plethora of benefits that resonate with modern day Australians.

Beyond the financial considerations, the allure of urban living is really undeniable.

You’ve got proximity to employment hubs, public transport networks, vibrant city life.

These are all compelling factors which drive people towards apartment living.

On top of that, the shift towards higher density housing propelled by urbanisation and sustainability in initiatives.

It further reinforces the attractiveness of apartment living.

The growing preference for apartment living carries significant implications for the future of Australian housing.

So policy makers, urban planners, developers, they have to adapt to accommodate this shift in consumer preferences.

Strategies aimed at promoting sustainable urban development, enhancing infrastructure, and addressing housing affordability are paramount.

And again, on top of that, initiatives to foster vibrant, inclusive communities within urban centres will be essential to ensure the long term viability and desirability of apartment living.

So while not everyone will want to live in a unit, the rise of long term low maintenance apartment living in Australia really reflects this broader societal shift towards urbanisation, affordability, and convenience.

As more individuals, embrace the benefits of apartment living, the traditional concept of home ownership really is undergoing that profound transformation.

So by recognising and adapting to these changing dynamics, all the stakeholders can shape a housing landscape that is responsive to the evolving needs and preferences of Australians.

As a property buyer and investor, you need to think about how you adapt to these wants and needs and lifestyles of the people you are buying property for.

That is critical to your success as an investor.

I will keep you posted on all things property from around Australia as our year progresses.

Hit like and subscribe, please. It really helps if you are enjoying all the content, and I will see you all again soon.

Bye.

Hello, everyone.

How are you all doing out there?

I’m Kate Hill bringing you the best unbiased, honest content on property along with fantastic hints and tips and news.

Stay tuned today to hear why there is a shift towards more long term apartment living happening in Australia.

The, what do I call it, landscape of Australian housing is undergoing a significant transformation with a notable increase in the number of people, individuals opting for long term apartment living.

This trend is propelled by various factors, most notably, Australia’s shrinking family size.

And that topic gets its very own separate video, so go and watch that.

And a widening gap between house and unit prices, prompts buyers to seek affordability, convenience in our urban settings.

According to Domain, the disparity in prices between houses and units has reached unprecedented levels.

They highlight that this phenomenon reflects a distortion within the housing market indicating either overvaluation of houses or undervaluation of units.

Domain suggest that this trend has been exacerbated of course by the ongoing effects of the pandemic reshaping perceptions of the ideal long term home.

As housing affordability becomes increasingly challenging, one of the research associates at the University of New South Wales has observed a notable shift towards apartment living.

They emphasised that while cost, obviously plays a significant role, other factors like proximity to work, transport, urban amenities contribute to this transition and also community.

The trend towards higher density housing further reinforces the appeal of apartment living with more Australians likely to embrace this lifestyle in the future.

The traditional notion of homeownership epitomised by the detached house on big block of land is really evolving, and Australians need to reassess their perceptions of the ideal first home in light of these changes.

As urban populations swell and cities expand, the dream of homeownership is adapting to align with contemporary realities.

The allure of apartment living lies not only in its affordability, but also in its suitability for urban lifestyles, which is, of course, characterised by convenience and accessibility and affordability.

Apartment living offers a plethora of benefits that resonate with modern day Australians.

Beyond the financial considerations, the allure of urban living is really undeniable.

You’ve got proximity to employment hubs, public transport networks, vibrant city life.

These are all compelling factors which drive people towards apartment living.

On top of that, the shift towards higher density housing propelled by urbanisation and sustainability in initiatives.

It further reinforces the attractiveness of apartment living.

The growing preference for apartment living carries significant implications for the future of Australian housing.

So policy makers, urban planners, developers, they have to adapt to accommodate this shift in consumer preferences.

Strategies aimed at promoting sustainable urban development, enhancing infrastructure, and addressing housing affordability are paramount.

And again, on top of that, initiatives to foster vibrant, inclusive communities within urban centres will be essential to ensure the long term viability and desirability of apartment living.

So while not everyone will want to live in a unit, the rise of long term low maintenance apartment living in Australia really reflects this broader societal shift towards urbanisation, affordability, and convenience.

As more individuals, embrace the benefits of apartment living, the traditional concept of home ownership really is undergoing that profound transformation.

So by recognising and adapting to these changing dynamics, all the stakeholders can shape a housing landscape that is responsive to the evolving needs and preferences of Australians.

As a property buyer and investor, you need to think about how you adapt to these wants and needs and lifestyles of the people you are buying property for.

That is critical to your success as an investor.

I will keep you posted on all things property from around Australia as our year progresses.

Hit like and subscribe, please. It really helps if you are enjoying all the content, and I will see you all again soon.

Bye.

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